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Looking for someone w/ Visual Novel experience - read post*

Posted: Sun Jun 01, 2014 12:48 pm
by ProsperousInterlude
Hi everyone! I am thinking of turning one of my manga projects into a visual novel. I've been looking for info online, but thought it would be best to ask people here for info on how to create a visual novel.

(If you'd like to check out some info/artwork on my project, go to www.facebook.com/prosperousinterlude)

This is basically consulting work. I'm looking for info on what's needed to create one (what type of software, outside help, etc), estimated costs, tips, etc.

I'm basically looking for a 'report' on how to make a visual novel. I'd be willing to pay $100 (but I would need something pretty detailed, not just a few pages of basic info that could be found online, or with a size 25 font - hence why I'm looking for someone who has pretty good experience making visual novels). If it's something extremely detailed (like you going all out on information, personal experience, etc), I'd be happy to pay more (even $100 more).

If you think you can be a great consultant, send me a note and we can discuss more, rate (if you think you can provide something worth more than $100, etc.).

Once again, someone with pretty good experience making Visual Novels.

Greatly appreciated. Thanks!

Re: Looking for someone w/ Visual Novel experience - read po

Posted: Sun Jun 01, 2014 11:01 pm
by gekiganwing
Looking at your Facebook page, it appears that you're trying to sell both a comic and a card game. Do you have any other plans?

There are some indie game creators here who might be able to offer advice based on experience. Be sure to look for forums in which indie comic / webcomic creators are willing to talk about their industry. Likewise, take the time to look through indie game forums, and pay attention to threads in which story-driven games are discussed.

The following are my NON-professional observations:

* English-speaking visual novel fandom has slowly emerged from the dark corners of anime-manga fandom. A decade ago, there was a modest number of professional visual novel translations. They didn't get much respect from fans, perhaps because most of the products were adults-only, and there were just a few which had compelling stories. Also back then, you could count the numbers of finished fan translations on one hand, and VNs written in English on your other hand.

* So yeah, as for 2014... the pro and fan translation scenes still have problems, but they're improving. The number of English-speaking fans creating free VNs might still be small, but I believe the scene is still growing. As recently as 2011, I expected that my local fan convention would have maybe one discussion panel per year dedicated to visual novels. This year, there were *four*!

* The first indie visual novel written in English was during 2008. Over the last six years, a few have been accepted on digital distribution services such as Gamersgate, Google Play, and Desura. Some people are selling story-driven games (in which there's quite a bit of story, but also an obvious emphasis on gameplay), and a few people are selling straightforward visual novels (a story with occasional choices, and no gameplay elements).

* Ren'py is one of several options available to creators. It's updated on a regular basis, it's free, and there's a large community able to provide support. Be sure to consider the options discussed in our Other Engines forum.

* Visual novels are still a small category of entertainment. Your average retailer might have one or two, but only if they're non-romance, worksafe games. In other words, you won't make money from people browsing shelves at Walmart. I believe you'll need to attract fans with art, writing, and perhaps gameplay. If you're fortunate, you can build a loyal fanbase. It's risky to use an art style that's distinct from recent anime-manga styles, but you might be able to find an audience.

* Perhaps there was a time when a person could release any game on Steam or iTunes and make a fortune. But those windows of opportunity may be more rumor than fact, and tend to close quickly. In other words, it isn't easy to convince people to spend money on your product. Some games can sell due to simple or compelling gameplay, good timing, or amusing memes. Not every niche game or story will sell. You need to promote your creative work. Read about marketing, how to find an audience, how to keep them interested, and so on.

* If you want to focus on comics or card games, that's fine. But if you are committed to your creative work, and ready to try a media format that's still somewhat unknown, consider creating and selling a visual novel. Be sure to think about the risks first.

Re: Looking for someone w/ Visual Novel experience - read po

Posted: Sun Jun 01, 2014 11:06 pm
by Asceai
gekiganwing wrote:* The first indie visual novel written in English was during 2008.
Huh?

Re: Looking for someone w/ Visual Novel experience - read po

Posted: Sat Jun 07, 2014 12:25 am
by Sorakun
So don't know if your still checking this but was curious if there where any updates on the project and did you get all the information you needed?