Page 2 of 2

Re: Wacom Inkling

Posted: Fri Sep 02, 2011 10:36 pm
by LVUER
@yummy:
It uses normal mini ballpoint refill. While for the pen itself, you could attach a string to it (and attach the other end to a big object). I always do that and it work wonders ^_^

@blakjak:
Well, it's for sketching and we're not supposed to erase things when sketching.

Re: Wacom Inkling

Posted: Sat Sep 03, 2011 4:03 am
by blakjak
I'm doing it wrong ! D:

Re: Wacom Inkling

Posted: Sat Sep 03, 2011 12:09 pm
by Aka-kami
200 dollars isn't that bad imo, sonsidering the type of technology it has... Heck the first time I saw it I though it would've costed a lot more.

Though being the poor person that I am it will take a while to get this. I'd also like to see an actual review on it first too... It still makes me giddy though <:'D

Oh, and on the non-erasable part, couldn't you just ink your pencil drawings? oAo?? I do that all the time...

Re: Wacom Inkling

Posted: Sat Sep 03, 2011 5:52 pm
by blakjak
Aka-kami wrote:Oh, and on the non-erasable part, couldn't you just ink your pencil drawings? oAo?? I do that all the time...
You could, but then what's the point of using inkling ?

Re: Wacom Inkling

Posted: Sat Sep 03, 2011 7:12 pm
by Camille
blakjak wrote:
Aka-kami wrote:Oh, and on the non-erasable part, couldn't you just ink your pencil drawings? oAo?? I do that all the time...
You could, but then what's the point of using inkling ?
Because after inking your drawing with Inkling, you can have it transferred straight to the computer with all the necessary different layers and stuff? So you don't have to do the inking/lineart on the computer.

Re: Wacom Inkling

Posted: Sun Sep 04, 2011 6:57 am
by blakjak
Ah I see.

Not worth it...

Posted: Sun Sep 04, 2011 1:11 pm
by mugenjohncel
Personally, I don't see the point in using this under normal circumstances...

You can simply draw in a piece of paper and scan it then edit it later in your favorite image-processor...

OK, so this gadget will import your sketches as vector but then again you already have a wide array of programs that can do that for you both free and commercial and chances are, the target market for this already had access to the said vectorizing programs and the necessary equipment. Besides even if this thing does what it advertises and export layers and layers of content... you'll still have to edit them in your PC...

Of course if you are in the middle of nowhere and suddenly got this really nice idea that you know you could use later then this will certainly beat scribbling on a piece of tissue... but that's just about it...

I really suggest and insist that people avoid this gadget and instead save up and get a refurbished Cintiq... I got mine for $1000... it's still expensive but definitely cheaper than brand new... if you really wanted to push things further, you could get the older first generation models (yes, those big clunky one's) for as low as $700...

Now if you really are itching to get your hands on a Cintiq but cannot afford it then you might want to look for "Motion LE1600"... it's a tablet PC slightly smaller than your standard sized LCD but definitely larger than your average tablet... old but still numerous... I happen to get some hands on in it a couple years back... Long story short, it basically functions like a Cintq only with 200 or maybe 300 something levels of pressure but what the heck... you can get one for as low as $250

"POOF" (Disappears)

Re: Wacom Inkling

Posted: Sun Sep 04, 2011 2:35 pm
by Celianna
Obviously mugenjohncel, you've never worked with programs that 'vectorize' bitmaps. It's horrible I tell you, it can never ever be accurate, unless you've got a really high resolution (at least 300 dpi) with VERY clean lines - and even then it can turn out really wrong. This is why graphic designers resort to tracing a bitmap themselves instead of using the pre-programmed vectorization options, because well, you can never get it to be accurate. With the Inkling it would turn the drawing into a vector which will be much more accurate, because you've drawn it yourself. Saves a lot of hassle.

And scanning takes a lot more work than doing this straight with the Inkling. When you scan it, you have to clean up your scan, and then digitally ink it again. With the Inkling, you've already 'inked' it, and you don't even need to scan it, because it'll be transferred straight to the computer.

The only draw back I see about the Inkling is that there's no way to erase something, and the drawing might be off if the receiver or paper shifts.

Re: Wacom Inkling

Posted: Tue Sep 06, 2011 12:57 am
by Soraminako
OMG. If this works as well as it claims it does, I need one like I need air!!

Middle of September!! Goodbye $199, you will be well spent! :mrgreen: