Writing vs. Drawing

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OokamiKasumi
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Re: Writing vs. Drawing

#16 Post by OokamiKasumi » Sun Mar 31, 2013 12:07 am

LVUER wrote:I use Wacom Bamboo Fun (the 1st generation one, still without those fancy touch capability)...
That's what I have!
LVUER wrote:...Win7, Photoshop CS3, and the pressure sensitivity works just fine (I do need to tweak some of the settings). Try re-installing different driver or try other software to see if the pressure sensitivity works. Flash should automatically detect pressure sensitivity without the need of tweaking any setting (use brush tool, not pencil/pen tool).
Will try that!
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Re: Writing vs. Drawing

#17 Post by latte » Sun Mar 31, 2013 12:49 am

@Ookami SAI is affordable and has really smooth lines. If I were to depend on Photoshpop I'd still be stuck scanning linearts to paint them digitally. Also, many professional artists use it, alone or combined with other software, so by all means get the trial version and see if it makes your life easier.

By the way, on the painting department, it makes blending much easier than PS, too.

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Re: Writing vs. Drawing

#18 Post by LateWhiteRabbit » Sun Mar 31, 2013 1:40 am

OokamiKasumi wrote: When it comes to Illustration, I only know my limits when I've hit the invisible brick wall head-first and come to a screeching (bleeding) halt with the sudden realization, "Oh, I can't do that."
  • I Can't use a tablet, I don't have the correct hand-eye coordination to use one. (Too used to drawing on paper.)
  • My pen doesn't do pressure sensitivity in Photoshop (and I still don't know why not #@!)
Photoshop not detecting pressure sensitivity is almost always a driver issue. You may need a newer Wacom driver. You'll also need to fully uninstall the Bamboo and all left over files, reboot without the tablet plugged in, and make sure Windows 7 doesn't try and automatically install drivers for the tablet when you plug it back in. Install the new drivers from Wacom's site, and you should be golden. After that, just make sure the brush you are using has settings set to use Pen Pressure.

As to using a tablet I've had extensive experience with it:
Like you, I started on a Bamboo. My experience was much like yours. I found it cumbersome, sloppy, and I couldn't draw with it. My coordination made it impossible - like you say, it just didn't ACT like drawing on paper. Later, at art school, I got some experience using an Intuos tablet. I mainly used it to model in Zbrush, but I found it much more responsive. I still drew everything on paper, then scanned it in and painstakingly inked it with vectors in Illustrator. Finally, I had a couple of illustration classes that FORBID me using pen and paper. I was forced to do all my work on a graphics tablet, both in class under supervision of the professor, and on my drawing assignments at home.

I sucked. It was humiliating. I felt like I either had to go so super slow to make decent lines as to drive me insane, or that I had regressed to an elementary school level with my skills. But I had no choice but to fail or keep practicing. Weeks went by, and I was drawing hours a day with no progress. My assignments looked like they had been done by a child with the shakes. The first class actually ended (9 weeks), and I still felt like I had only marginally improved with a tablet, if at all. The second class started, with the same results, and two weeks in I ... got better overnight. Literally. It wasn't gradual. One day, my coordination with the tablet sucked, the next day all my skill with pen and paper seemed to FLOOD back in, and I could draw as easily and as well on a tablet as on paper. My own personal theory is that my brain had to rewire itself to reconnect to where ever my "drawing ability" skills were stored, but once that happened....

The tablet makes a big difference too - Bamboos have pressure sensitivity, yes, but it is nowhere near the pressure sensitivity of a real pencil. Basically, Bamboos are mice with better ergonomics. Getting a tablet with extreme sensitivity to pressure (especially since I draw lightly with feathered strokes), and most importantly TILT SENSITIVITY, made all the difference in the world. At that point, I could hold and move the stylus exactly like a real pencil and get the same results.

I now do nearly ALL my drawing on an Intuos 4M. (I got one on the cheap when my studio had to liquidate its assets.) All my art is now done start to finish on the computer and I LOVE it. I recently needed my art pencils for something and when I opened their case they had cobwebs on them! :lol: I used a Cintiq occasionally at art school and at the studio I worked at, but I found the colors and pressure sensitivity wasn't quite there for me. They were awesome, just not awesome enough to justify the price tag.

Drawing with a tablet is all about practice (massive amounts worth). You basically have to retrain your brain, but when it happens, you'll get all your experience back and then some. Take it for what it's worth, but I once felt the same way as you, and now I can do 5 minute ear doodles that look like this, all solely with a tablet.
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Re: Writing vs. Drawing

#19 Post by VerdeICe » Sun Mar 31, 2013 1:54 am

I believe in writing. No matter how good the art (though it dose play a part, I know) if the story is garbage then all I'm doing is looking at a bunch of character sprites awkwardly poising and CG that I can find anywhere with no tedious pressing of my enter button.

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Re: Writing vs. Drawing

#20 Post by OokamiKasumi » Sun Mar 31, 2013 4:52 am

LateWhiteRabbit wrote:Photoshop not detecting pressure sensitivity is almost always a driver issue... As to using a tablet I've had extensive experience with it...
Like you, I started on a Bamboo. My experience was much like yours. I found it cumbersome, sloppy, and I couldn't draw with it. ... I felt like I either had to go so super slow to make decent lines as to drive me insane, or that I had regressed to an elementary school level with my skills.
That's exactly what I'm going through. It's sooo humiliating because I can do so much better on paper, and a million times faster.
LateWhiteRabbit wrote:...The second class started, with the same results, and two weeks in I ... got better overnight. Literally. It wasn't gradual. One day, my coordination with the tablet sucked, the next day all my skill with pen and paper seemed to FLOOD back in, and I could draw as easily and as well on a tablet as on paper. My own personal theory is that my brain had to rewire itself to reconnect to where ever my "drawing ability" skills were stored, but once that happened...

Drawing with a tablet is all about practice (massive amounts worth). You basically have to retrain your brain, but when it happens, you'll get all your experience back and then some. Take it for what it's worth, but I once felt the same way as you, and now I can do 5 minute ear doodles that look like this, all solely with a tablet.
Thank you so much for telling me this. I'm gonna try again. Only this time, I'm not giving up.
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Re: Writing vs. Drawing

#21 Post by Ronove » Sun Mar 31, 2013 11:27 am

I remember when I got my first tablet (I was fourteen I think so I've had a tablet for ten years now) it was really hard to get the swing of it. What I did to get used to it was a bunch of sloppy doodles just getting the hang of pressure sensitivity and practicing not looking at my hands while drawing. Now it's like second nature (though I still have a hard time doing backgrounds with a tablet (but that's because I usually don't do backgrounds so I never practiced really)).

As for the topic of the thread, I think art is harder than the writing. The main reason being that with art, you have to be consistent--from portraits to CGs, gotta make sure your character is still drawn the same way. You can't have one character looking like amazing whereas the others are noticeably wrong compared to the others, you also have to make sure your characters are dynamic enough to be interesting so people don't mind staring at them. For me, art takes way longer than writing does and I think that factors in to what I think is harder. Writing I can just get out what I need, put it down, go back and edit, etc. and then really be done with it.

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Re: Writing vs. Drawing

#22 Post by Omnificent » Sun Mar 31, 2013 3:38 pm

Writing is a million times more difficult. If a sprite looks a little off and the writing is baller, no one will care. If the sprite looks good but the writing is boring, no one will care, as in no one will read your work. So I expect that once I get into the art stage with my game progress will speed up.
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Re: Writing vs. Drawing

#23 Post by Zylinder » Sun Mar 31, 2013 3:43 pm

I find art easier because how good your piece is is immediately apparent. If I'm making lots of mistakes and something looks deformed, I know right away that I'm on the wrong track. This allows me to judge for myself if the piece is worth putting in the daylight and how to correct it.

With writing, you can write a whole book's worth of crap and you'll never know it, especially if your beta is an enabler who just nods and smiles even if you pass her a novel of tripe. It means I have to scrutinize my own work with enough objectivity, all while fighting off that IT'SALLCRAP feeling. Which makes everything a more complicated affair than it should be. :C

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Re: Writing vs. Drawing

#24 Post by Pyonkotchi » Sun Mar 31, 2013 4:00 pm

writing because i don't know how to words good.

when i draw, i can just draw it. "jeff is fighting tim" Drawing that scene isn't that hard, I could easily draw a stick men comic and people could probably figure out that these guys are fighting, but writing is more difficult, "showing" with words. I cant just say "Jeff fought Tim" (i can but what kind of fight scene is that right?! :T)

its just a lot easier to see my mistakes when i draw
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Re: Writing vs. Drawing

#25 Post by Kokoro Hane » Mon Apr 01, 2013 12:49 am

Personally, I find drawing to be more difficult. I can write and program things fast into a game, but the art aspect always gets to me. I can draw, but I still have limitations. Especially when drawing certain poses can be difficult. I have not made art for a game yet, but I am starting too, but I have always found writing easier, as I do draw manga.
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Re: Writing vs. Drawing

#26 Post by Carrogath » Tue Apr 02, 2013 4:29 pm

Drawing all the way. It's nice to be able to to draw, because everyone wants to know what their characters look like when they're out of your head and staring you in the face, but it's incredibly time-consuming for a perfectionist like me who won't stop working on something until they're satisfied with it. Being able to see the finished product is almost worth the effort, until you realize that you're going to improve a few months from now and will want to redraw it because the image in your head has changed along with your drawing ability.

As for writing, it's a compulsion for me, so it's not like I could give up writing even if I wanted to. Sure, there are days when I can't put anything to paper, but there will always be the need for me to write down my thoughts. It's not something I worry about, at least. I think that, once you get to a certain point as a writer, it becomes less of a choice and more of a need. That sounds weird, though...

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Re: Writing vs. Drawing

#27 Post by Krescentwolf » Tue Apr 02, 2013 7:47 pm

Obscura wrote:Thanks for your responses, guys.
LateWhiteRabbit wrote: With writing, you generally have to stay completely engaged and thinking critically the entire time.
This is definitely the case for me, I believe. And a reflection of how my brain works. I can't even have any music on when I write.
That's exactly the opposite for me. I find myself INSPIRED by music, so much so that most of my written works have their own exclusive soundtrack.

Drawing is definitely the more difficult of the two for me. It's the one that takes effort and concentration, but like one previous poster said, there DOES come a point where you've basically been put on auto-pilot.

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Re: Writing vs. Drawing

#28 Post by LadyAvori » Sun Apr 07, 2013 1:15 pm

I've been writing and drawing since I was little so both come easy to me. I'm a hobbyist and do them just for enjoyment, so they lack that professional polish.

What is going to suck is programming for me. I hear that Ren'py is easy, but when I look at it I get lost and confused and have to revisit the "Ren'py for Dummies" pages. I feel like wearing a dunce hat when I program. I can't get an If command to work to save my life.

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Re: Writing vs. Drawing

#29 Post by deviltales » Mon Apr 08, 2013 8:49 am

I'm a mediocre wanna-be artist and (I think!) a pretty good, or at least capable writer. I find writing more troublesome than drawing, even If I'm better at telling stories rather than drawing them. In case of writer's block, I recover and get back on track a lot slower than an artist' block.
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Re: Writing vs. Drawing

#30 Post by enta » Mon Apr 08, 2013 9:44 am

I guess drawing is easier---but hey, I've been loving and drawing stickmen since I was 2(according to my dad) so how's that? It's not like I've been writing since I was two so the drawing which I've been engaging with will be more easier. Obviously.

Since English wasn't my first language I always end up doing:
Thinking in Japanese--->Planning in Japanese--->Converting those to English---> Writing.
My time is always doubled in writing since I am playing with two languages. It was quite difficult for me to come up with ideas in English especially if I'm basing some of them in my daily life. Situation becomes worst when I get a writer's block. However when drawing, I could build the idea in Japanese or English or German or Chinese and just move my pen and draw it. It's easy, it's fast and I rarely ever get an artist's block!

But there are times that I'm feeling brilliant and is writing like a maniac but can't draw anything at all. It's just a matter of mood, I think.

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