Greeny's Guide to Art Commissions

Questions, skill improvement, and respectful critique involving art assets.
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Greeny
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Re: Greeny's Guide to Art Commissions

#46 Post by Greeny » Tue Nov 12, 2013 10:48 am

pineapplepocky wrote: YOU CAN SAY NO.

To any commission, to any request, you can always refuse. Even if it was paying, and you don't feel comfortable drawing something, it's completely fine to refuse. I would rather work on a children's game for cheaper than get paid more for drawing something ridiculously violent and pornographic (well, actually...). But my point is, if you are doing a commission, do it because it will make you feel good. Do it because you want to. If that commission is something that makes you feel like you're losing your dignity, or if it's so overly complicated you have no idea how to start, it's completely fine to refuse. They'll just find someone else, happy ending.
I felt like this was covered under "having clear standards", but you're right, it's a good idea to put some more stress on this.
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Re: Greeny's Guide to Art Commissions

#47 Post by Tempus » Thu Nov 21, 2013 1:05 am

Hellboy wrote:Something I’d like to read about is how others handle corrections or changes during the process.
Personally I allow for three changes. One major, two minor. I define what constitutes major or minor changes before I start, along with other things. Once they use up those allotted changes, extra charges apply. I try my best to avoid that situation by requesting clarifications on anything I'm unsure about before I start.

I'm usually quite lenient and don't count the changes if I feel like it's not inconveniencing me or isn't unreasonable. If they want something a different colour, fine by me. It's not hard to change. It's only when they keep wanting millions of minor changes that it becomes a problem. Then I'll notify them, "I'm going to count X amount of colour changes (or similar minor alterations) as a minor change."
pineapplepocky wrote:YOU CAN SAY NO. To any commission, to any request, you can always refuse. Even if it was paying, and you don't feel comfortable drawing something, it's completely fine to refuse.
Yeah, it's important to be ready to turn down things you can't do or don't want to do. I think I turned down my first three offers when I started. Also, be ready for people asking for discounts. I don't do discounts because as far as I'm concerned I'm already giving a discount. I charge what often works out to less than half minimum wage in my country. I modify the prices based on the complexity of the request. Of course... if a project swept me off my feet that'd be another matter...
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Re: Greeny's Guide to Art Commissions

#48 Post by Nagato999 » Thu Feb 13, 2014 8:40 pm

Thanks for all the advice! Btw, can anybody show me a sample of their contract? Despite the thought that it wouldn't hold up in court, if it ever came to that, is there at least something that can be considered standard? Something like an IP clause, or 'agreement to freelance work' paragraph, etc.

Or, can anyone recommend a book on an artist's contract?

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Re: Greeny's Guide to Art Commissions

#49 Post by LateWhiteRabbit » Fri Feb 14, 2014 12:28 am

Nagato999 wrote:Thanks for all the advice! Btw, can anybody show me a sample of their contract? Despite the thought that it wouldn't hold up in court, if it ever came to that, is there at least something that can be considered standard? Something like an IP clause, or 'agreement to freelance work' paragraph, etc.

Or, can anyone recommend a book on an artist's contract?
You'll want the Graphic Artist's Guild Handbook: Pricing and Ethical Guidelines. It is pretty much the number one recommended book from working freelancers. They also update it every year to keep it current.

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Ryuno
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Re: Greeny's Guide to Art Commissions

#50 Post by Ryuno » Thu Apr 03, 2014 4:10 pm

Excellent thread, and not just for art: most of the principles can be applied to other freelancing areas, such as music. The only things I personally do not agree with are the matter of pricing (because the economy is definitely not the same all around the world) and having a price list as an essential point of your thread; however, even if not all of it works for me, I appreciate your effort of compiling these tips and would definitely have had an easier start as a freelancer if I had come across a guide like that.

Definitely a must-read, thank you.

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