General Writing FAQs and Resources

Questions, skill improvement, and respectful critique involving game writing.
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General Writing FAQs and Resources

#1 Post by Alte » Sun Jan 01, 2012 6:28 pm

FAQs
Written by: CheeryMoya | Writing Resources
Note: If all else fails, don't be afraid to talk with others about your story. Input from other people can be helpful to you in order to understand what your audience might expect to see and what they would like to see. Discussion is almost an all-purpose solution and a useful tool to get back on track.
Table of Contents (use Ctrl+F to and enter the number of the topic you're looking for to jump to it)
  • 1. How do I begin writing a story?
    2. What defines a deep and developed protagonist?
    3. What kinds of side characters should I make and how many should I have?
    4. How do I name my story and characters?
    5. How do I end my story?
    6. How do I overcome writer’s block?/How do I continue my story if I can't find a good way out?
    7. I have this great idea, but is it good enough to write on?
    8. Should I avoid stereotypes and clichés?
    9. Is writing a VN/KN different from conventional writing?
    10. How do I "expand" on an idea?
    11. How can I get to know/understand my characters better?
    12. I want to write, but I have no clue what to write about.
1. How do I begin writing a story?
Simple: just start with an idea you know you can work with. If you haven't written a story before, you should probably start out with something small. Once you have a basic idea down, toy around with the possibilities and find out who your characters are, what’s going to happen, and how it'll all turn out. As always, follow the basic narrative structure: Exposition, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, Resolution (If you need a refresher on what each part is exactly, refer to the Wikipedia article). Once you know where you're headed, go ahead and start typing!

2. What defines a deep and developed protagonist?
A well-developed protagonist is one that readers can sympathize with and has a personal history that will likely explain his or her actions throughout the course of the story. A successfully well-written protagonist will probably leave a greater impact on the reader than a bland, uninteresting one. Oftentimes a protagonist will be "dynamic;" in other words, he or she will change somehow during the course in the story. It is up to the writer if the protagonist is a blank slate (no personality) or has a set personality.

3. What kinds of side characters should I make and how many should I have?
Protip: only have as many characters as the story absolutely dictates. Ideally, each character should be unique from the others and serve a purpose; if an existing character can fulfill the same function and/or two characters are alike, you can combine the two characters into one. Side characters exist to either aid or oppose the protagonist and move the narrative forward.

4. How do I name my story and characters?
There are several methods of naming your creations, and sometimes the best ones will present itself along with your ideas or at unexpected moments when you least expect it. For those of you who want a systematic way to thinking up of a good name for your story, look back on the core ideas, moods, or themes you want to focus on and see if you can find a name that suits it; if that’s not enough, discussing it with others can help you as well. Likewise, naming a character follows a similar vein. Find a name that you think matches a character’s personality, or discuss names with others.

5. How do I end my story?
This may sometimes be the hardest part of writing a story- ending it. Really, the way you end the story is entirely up to you. If the conclusion does not come naturally to you as you write, ask yourself these questions:
  • Should my protagonist achieve his or her goal?
  • Has my protagonist learned anything throughout the story?
  • What has my protagonist gained or lost- spiritually, physically, or both- during the course of the events?
  • What is the mood of my story after the climax and what mood do I want after the end?
  • What sort of impact do I want to leave on the audience?
Again, if this still does not help you, discussing possible endings with others (preferably your team if you have one, as you do not want to spoil your story for your audience even before it is completed) may help.

6. How do I overcome writer’s block?/How do I continue my story if I can't find a good way out?
Nearly, if not all, writers have experienced a time when it seems that the inspiration to write has disappeared. This is normal, but quite understandingly frustrating. There are several methods to deal with and get rid of writer's block:
  • Go over what you have of your story so far from the eyes of the reader. Follow the plot and see where you were going as the author, then figure out what direction the story should head next.
  • Relax! Stop writing and go on a short hiatus to clear your mind. Come back a few days later and see if your muse has returned.
  • (If working with a VN engine) Work on another part of your project such as the visuals or programming if possible.
  • (If writing a branching VN) Work on a different scenario or outcome.
  • Read and play other works here. Perhaps you'll find your inspiration again.
7. I have this great idea, but is it good enough to write on?
This really depends on what idea that is. Chances are if you want to read that type of story, then probably someone else would like to as well. If you only recently got the idea, try expanding upon it and see where it goes; if you can follow it and can write it, then by all means start writing! As always, you can talk with others about the basic premise without spoilers and see how many people are interested in your idea.

8. Should I avoid stereotypes and clichés?
The common answer is yes. Keep in mind that stereotypes are often based in real life, so it may be difficult to avoid one without bumping into another. As for clichés, a wide audience will be familiar with them; whether this is a good thing or not depends on who that audience is. A common method of escaping stereotypes and clichés is to "invert" it, or to betray the expectations of the reader and therefore surprise them with something new.

9. Is writing a VN/KN different from conventional writing?
Somewhat, considering that a VN/KN will likely focus more on dialogue and the interactions between characters. Most of the time the visuals will clear the need to describe the current setting and actions of characters, but you are still free to write about them if you wish. To sum it up, you should see the VN format as being similar to writing a play with character dialogue and scene directions.

10. How do I "build up" on an idea?
Letting the idea toss around in your mind will often gather a lot of mass, but some of those excess things may not be usable in the long run. To organize your thoughts, you can take a piece of paper and draw a flowchart or open up a program that will let you do something similar. A few questions you can ask yourself to propel your story forward are:
  • What is my protagonist trying to achieve?
  • What is the conflict my protagonist is dealing with?
  • What events will take place during the course of the story?
  • What will my protagonist do to overcome these obstacles?
This flowchart will act as your guide when you need to know where to go next in your story. Not everything you get down in the planning stage will be absolute and concrete, as you may have to change a few things as you work and set these ideas into motion.

11. How can I get to know/understand my characters better?
You'll find it hard to continue your story if you cannot understand the thinking processes of your characters; you'll also have difficulty recognizing them if they act out-of-character. To avoid this, it's a definite must to write down their basic information, history, and personalities. After that's done, try typing up a part with them in it to see what they do and how they interact with other characters. If you're unsatisfied with how they act, the time to change them is now. Soon you'll know your characters as if they were old friends of yours :)

12. I want to write, but I have no clue what to write about.
That's a real shame, then :lol: In all honesty, a creative mind should have no problem brainstorming an idea; the problem lies within finding an idea that's worth writing about. It takes time to stumble upon a good one by yourself, and you'll likely get a flood of plot bunnies by talking to other people or reading someone else's stuff. You can go to the Ideas Dump thread and sift through a few, or use a generator until you find a viable plot to work with.
Last edited by Alte on Sun Jan 31, 2016 10:03 am, edited 5 times in total.

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Writing Resources

#2 Post by Alte » Sun Jan 01, 2012 6:30 pm

Here is a list of resources that can be useful to the aspiring writer. If there's a website that you think would benefit others, make a post below and I'll add it to this list.

Articles
Description: what's it for? (An article about how to write tasteful imagery)
Guest Post: Beyond the First Two Pages by Nancy Fulda (How to hook your readers into your story)
Introduction to the Hero's Journey
How to Write Humor: What Makes Something So Funny? by Rochelle Frank
How I Went From Writing 2,000 Words a Day to 10,000 Words a Day by Rachel Aaron
Learn Writing with Uncle Jim collected by MacAllister
Storyfix (Blog on writing opinions, tips, etc.)
Fiction Factor
Writing Three-Dimensional Villains by Luna--Rose
Writing-World.com
The 7 Types of Short Story Opening, and How to Decide Which is Right for Your Story
Wordgathering (A Journal of Disability Poetry and Literature)
"Outline Your Novel in 30 Minutes" by Alicia Rasley
Off the Record: Method Writing
See How Easily You Can Write A Novel Using The Snowflake Method
Writing Dialogue: The Music of Speech
Articles | Holly Lisle
The Significance of Plot Without Conflict
Sukeban-style character building
Just Another Day: Slice of Life Stories
Gail Carson Levine
Writing Articles on WritersWrite.com
Temple of the Seven Golden Camels (maintained by a storyboard artist at Disney)
Kinetic Literature
Visual Novel Criticism
Brandon Sanderson
How Not to Write a Novel
How to Write Characters by Kinjo Goldbar

Lists and Tips
Resource Dump: Creating Characters!
Interjections
Tips to avoid Stereotypes
Written Sound (Onomatopoeia)
Glossary of Poetic Terms
The 12 Stages of Intimacy [Adult] by OokamiKasumi
The Twelve Steps of Intimacy
Tips Sharing: How to write Horror by Meinos Kaen
destiny_921's Guide to Writing
Let's Gripe about Horror (transcript)
10 Ways to Evolve Horror Games
Storytelling Secrets from the Creators of South Park
Elmore Leonard on Writing (YouTube Video)
Intro to Brandon Sanderson Creative Writing 2013 (video lectures series about writing popular fantasy/scifi novels, which can be applied to visual novel writing, for most genres.)
"Write what you know" - Nathan Englander on Misunderstood Advice (YouTube Video)
Write a scene in 11 steps (infographic)
Full description of "How to write a scene"
Stephen King’s Top 7 Tips for Becoming a Better Writer
Daily Writing Tips
Building Characters: Tips from Chris Avellone
Pixar's 22 Rules of Storytelling
Pixar's 22 Rules of Story, Analyzed as a PDF eBook (Stephan Vladimir Bugaj)
Jerry Seinfeld Explains How to Write a Joke
Writing CrAcK By Kita the Spaz
Elizabeth Craig: 15 Tips for Writing a Murder Mystery
25 Things You Need To Know About Writing Mysteries, By Susan Spann
terribleminds writing tag
Friendly writing advice by SelLi
Mouse Deer and Tiger and Twine: A Video Tutorial
5 storytelling tips for beginners (Mirrowdothack)
Three writing tips you shoudn't listen to (Taleweaver)
Questions to brainstorm a title
Four ways to write a great story by sasquatchii
Dead Words Reference Sheet
Nano Tip #1: Dialog Spine
Writing Interactive Fiction in Six Steps
Adjective Order (Opinion -> Size -> Age -> Shape -> Colour -> Origin -> Material -> Purpose )
The Secret Rules of Adjective Order
Blank Character Sheet (Over 370 Questions!)
The EPIGUIDE.COM Character Chart for Fiction Writers

Articles by OokamiKasumi
Writing Tip: Basic PLOTTING
Writing Tip: Structure of the GOTHIC Tale
Writing Tip: STUCK on a Story?
Writing Tip: Writing HORROR
Writing Tip: Finding the THEME ~ Brian McDonald
Writing Tip: Using CHOICE in a Story ~ Varytale
Writing Tip: Planning the Multi-path Game ~ ChoiceScript
Writing Tip: Plotting - The Murphy's Law Method
How to be ORIGINAL ~ Brian McDonald
Making Games more Interesting?
Writing Tip: Advanced Character CREATION
Advice on Writing Narrative in VNs
Character-Driven does NOT mean: A story that focuses on the characters.
(Even more) Writing Tips and Tricks [DeviantArt]

Advices by LateWhiteRabbit
How to write characters that people love in a short time?
How Does One Flesh Out a Story?
How do I write a strong beginning?
Writing Solo or Writing with a Co-Writer?
How You Choose Which Relationship To Write First
Daily Military Life - planktheory | Daily Military Life - LateWhiteRabbit's contributions
Big 'Ol Mind Screw Endings - logical
Successful padding
Tips to writing psychological horror?
Point of View Switching
Creating a Fictional World, ASPIRE method
First Person / Third Person
What Makes a Good Bad Guy?
How much is too much?
redeyesblackpanda insight expansion |About villains
How much writing is too little imagining? | Literary examples | Narrations in movies | The definition of action we are concerned with as writers is this:

Podcast
Writing Excuses (Fifteen minutes long, because you're in a hurry, and we're not that smart.)
The Paper Wings Show (a better understanding on making comics and creating characters)
Quick and Dirty Tips (for Better Writing)
The Buzz (A Visual Novel Podcast)

LGBTIQ
Queer as Tropes
Transgender experiences – Information and support
Transgender Terminology
Understanding Transgender People FAQ
Neutrois
Under the Ace Umbrella: Demisexuality and Gray-asexuality
Gender wiki
Androgyne Online
Gender-neutral pronouns.
A Speech by Lana Wachowski
The UK LGBT Archive

Generators or Database
serendipity (Name generators and other useful things)
seventhsanctum (More generators)
TV Tropes (A database with the common techniques used in all sorts of media)
Dictionary.com (is committed to accelerating the discovery and mastery of English in all its forms.)
Thesaurus.com (which has more than just synonyms)
Wikitionary (a wiki-based Open Content dictionary]
Writer's Plot Generator
WolframAlpha (Not only for your math homework, but can also tell you information about words!)
Project Gutenberg (Free ebook project)
Springhole.net (It has some great generators, tips for writing, world building, etc.)
20,000+ Names From Around the World!
Behind the Name - the etymology and history of first names

Grammar
Proofreading and you! by Riviera
Guide to Grammar and Writing
GrammarBook (Grammar rules)
Grammar Bytes! (Grammar Instruction with Attitude)
grammarcat.com (An Online Catalogue of English Grammar Exercises)

Game Creation-Specific Articles
The IF Reader: Game design theories
The making of Planescape: Torment
Standard Patterns in Choice-Based Games
Using an Interactive Visual Novel to Promote Patient Empowerment through Engagement
Lost Garden
Amit’s Game Programming Information
Helpful Articles and Information Resources maintained by Morhighan

Tumblrs about writing
Hey, Writers! (where they collect imagery like characters, scenes, dialogue, etc.)
F Yeah Character Development
Writing Pals (Place to meet possible critique buds and similar writers)
Write World
Write Me In (collection of real characteristics in hopes of helping others build more realistic characters)
Writing Quotes
Writer Chatter
Writer's Relief (Submission service to help creative writers get published)
That Writer Junkie
Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows
Reference For Writers
Tumblr Writing Prompts Blog

Writing prompts
March Writing Prompts
Free Writing - Daily Writing Prompt
Writing Exercises and Prompts for Journaling, Prose, Poetry and Memoirs
CreativeWritingPrompts.com
Daily Writing Tips - Writing Prompts 101
365 Creative Writing Prompts
The Writer - Writing Prompts
475 writing prompts
Writing Prompt Links

Mind-mapping program
FreePlane
Yed Graph Editor
Chat Mapper
Cmap
Twine
Lucidchart
Scapple
Flow Chart Maker & Online Diagram Software

Full-screen writing program/ Distraction-free editor
Writemonkey [Windows]
FocusWriter [Windows, Mac, Linux]
ZenWriter [Windows]
Sublime Text [Windows, Mac, Linux]
Q10 [Windows]
Dark Room [Windows]
WriteRoom [Mac]
ommwriter [Mac, PC, and iPad]
ByWord [Mac, iPhone and iPad]

Text editor/ Web Application
Editra [Windows, Mac, Linux]
Atom [Windows, Mac, Linux]
Notepad++ [Windows]
Resoph Notes [the desktop Windows version of SimpleNote or Notational Velocity]
yWriter5 [Windows, GNU/Linux and Mac OS X using Wine]
LibreOffice [Linux, Windows, Mac, FreeBSD, NetBSD, Android (Viewer)]
Write or Die [Web application] (An app that forces you to write by deleting some of your words when you don't type)

Written? Kitten! [Web application] (Similar to WriteorDie, but this rewards you with pictures of kitties!)
Here's how you customize the images you get: http://www.bigboardroom.com/writtenkitten/?search=_____
For example:
http://www.bigboardroom.com/writtenkitten/?search=roses
http://www.bigboardroom.com/writtenkitt ... ch=meerkat
- Source

Screenwriting software, Productivity, or Organizing
Scrivener [Windows, Mac]
Trelby [Windows, Linux]
Evernote [Windows, Mac, Mobile, and Tablet]
Celtx [Cross-platform]
Pomodoro Technique [Time management method]
Google Drive [Cloud storage]
Dropbox [File hosting]
WorkFlowy [Thought management]
Trello [web-based project management application]
HacknPlan [web planning tool designed for videogame development]

Adaptable Literature
Play (theatre) | Poetry | Reference | Stories
Last edited by Alte on Sun Jul 01, 2018 10:51 pm, edited 16 times in total.

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Re: General Writing FAQs and Resources

#3 Post by Kindred87 » Tue Jan 10, 2012 3:28 am

I hope this remains bumped. *bumps needlessly*

Anyhow, do you think talking about The Hero's Journey here would be of use?

Edit - Sorry for not PM'ing...I got preoccupied with the needless bump *sniff* :(
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Re: General Writing FAQs and Resources

#4 Post by PyTom » Tue Jan 10, 2012 10:10 am

This thread is a sticky. There's no need to bump it.
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Re: General Writing FAQs and Resources

#5 Post by Kindred87 » Tue Jan 10, 2012 3:57 pm

Oh goodness, that's embarrassing. >< I'm very sorry for being such a noob...

I must be too used to stickies being separate from the main list of threads (even though I've already read a few here). That and the fact that stickied threads are usually about the rules, or something about the community as a whole.
But I suppose it's just one more thing that sets these forums apart from the other game maker communities I've frequented in the past.


But if I may inquire, are discussions (abiding by the rules here) allowed in stickied threads? Since that's kinda' what I'm doing, I hope so x|
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Re: General Writing FAQs and Resources

#6 Post by CheeryMoya » Thu Jan 12, 2012 2:12 am

Tutorial: The Hero’s Journey

This is a question that merits its own individual post, as it has a total of 12 parts (sometimes more, depending on which model you look at) to it. The Hero’s Journey is the traditional plot skeleton of adventure novels and myths in which the protagonist travels to fulfill some sort of destiny, meeting both allies and foes along the way. At the end of the Journey, the hero has changed in a significant way. Again, the names of each step are interchangeable depending on which model you refer to.
Note: These stories often do not focus primarily on romantic elements, though that does not mean you cannot mix in a bit of romance into your story. There are no written rules saying that you must follow this exact pattern either; feel free to mix up and reorganize the 12 parts as you please as long as you can tell a coherent story doing so.

1. Ordinary World
The story begins with the protagonist living in a regular, unexciting world where nothing interesting happens. Things are relatively normal here, and the protagonist may feel bored or unsatisfied with life in general. The element of the Ordinary World is present to create a stark contrast with the new world the protagonist will enter.

2. Call To Adventure
The protagonist becomes aware of a problem or adventure beckons. A goal is stated and the protagonist endeavors to achieve it by leaving the Ordinary World behind. The Call to Adventure sets the plot into motion.

3. Refusal Of The Call
The protagonist hesitates leaving the Ordinary World to enter the unknown. A reluctance to give up safety and the fear of facing an unfamiliar territory is daunting to the point of giving the protagonist second thoughts. Something has to propel the protagonist into action; change of circumstance, unbalancing of natural order, persuasion of others, or any other reason is needed to convince the protagonist to embark on the Journey.

4. Mentor
An older, experienced figure will be introduced to the story, acting as a teacher to the younger protagonist. The bond between them is comparable to relationships such as parent-child, teacher-student, doctor-patient, etc. The Mentor will prepare the protagonist for the adventure with skills, equipment, advice, and anything else that is needed; however, the Mentor will oftentimes be unable to accompany the protagonist on the Journey.

5. Crossing The First Threshold
At last, the Journey truly starts here. The protagonist is finally ready to commit to the Call to Adventure and agrees to face the hardship and danger. The story’s action really begins and gets exciting.

6. Tests, Allies, And Enemies
The protagonist enters the new world and meets both allies and enemies on the way to achieving the goal. The rules and laws of the new world are learned, and more obstacles are introduced. This stage allows for development in the protagonist and companions when there are times of stress and necessary decision-making.

7. Approach To The Inmost Cave
The protagonist and friends arrive at their destination, where the confrontation against the antagonist will take place. This might be the most dangerous place for them, and entering is like crossing the second major threshold. The protagonist may pause before entering to organize, plan, and strategize ways to accomplish the ultimate goal.

8. The Supreme Ordeal
The climax of the story; the protagonist is forced to face fears and, in some situations, possibly death. This part is the most suspenseful and will bring the audience to the edge of their seats in anticipation. All the steps previous to this one have led the audience to sympathize and understand the protagonist’s fate, and readers vicariously experience the protagonist’s struggle. The triumph is much sweeter when the path to obtaining it is bitter.

9. Reward
The protagonist has succeeded! All the spoils are gathered, whether it is a tangible object or an intangible prize. The audience shares in the protagonist’s victory, and the mood is fairly joyous.

10. The Road Back
The protagonist must return to the Ordinary World now that the goal has been completed. However, the forces behind the conflict to begin with will chase the protagonist and threaten to bring harm.

11. Resurrection
The protagonist must go through one more ordeal before returning home. This is almost an encore of the Supreme Ordeal, as the opposing forces get one more chance to hurt the protagonist in a life-and-death moment. If the protagonist survives, then the return to the Ordinary World is finished.

12. Return with Elixir
The conclusion of the story; the protagonist returns to the beginning, but this time with the reward that was obtained. All is back to normal, and even better now due to the knowledge gained on the Journey.

-----
Kindred87 wrote:But if I may inquire, are discussions (abiding by the rules here) allowed in stickied threads? Since that's kinda' what I'm doing, I hope so x|
Ehehe, thanks for the bump, although it wasn't needed. It's the thought that counts though ^^ I'd rather keep the thread free of posts that aren't part of the writing resources, so I'd prefer it if questions and comments were PM'd to me. Maybe we could start another thread discussing how to improve this one, but would that be unnecessary?

Anyways, since this is sorta like a tutorial on how to write mainly non-ren'ai stories, would there be an interest in an FAQ dedicated to ren'ai games? It'd take me a hell of a long time to get one typed up, but it's for the community, and I'll be willing to help my fellow writers improve in any way possible.

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Re: General Writing FAQs and Resources

#7 Post by Calissa Leigh » Wed Apr 11, 2012 5:02 pm

Could I add some writing resources? (I'm a writer so I've got loads. :) )

Absolute Write's Novel Writing Forum - Learning tips to write a good story starts with... writing a good story. :) So learning how to write a novel well can help shape stories.

Learn to Write with Uncle Jim- If you don't have time to go through the forum, at least read this one.

And go pick up some books on how to write at the library. My favorites are "Self Editing for Fiction Writers" and "Techniques of the Selling Writer". If you can find those, you're golden. :)

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Re: General Writing FAQs and Resources

#8 Post by Obscura » Thu Apr 26, 2012 2:38 pm

I guess I'll add this to this wonderful resource list!

This is a link to one of the character sheets for Planescape: Torment, a 1999 RPG that many hail as one of the most well written games ever.

Even though it's an RPG, it's EXTREMELY word heavy. The game itself has over 800,000 words. This was before 3D engines became default for RPGs, so the game is composed of sprites and 2D static screens. The creators made the decision to bring much of the world alive through text.

The character sheet is for a non-party character named Ravel. It contains spoilers for the game.

This is a link to the article about writing the game.

http://www.rpgwatch.com//show/article?a ... f=0&id=208

Towards the bottom you'll see a link to a word document for the character sheet, and then the final document that was created from the character sheet.

You can see the amount of detail, love, and sweat they put into just this single character and the myriad options surrounding her. This is amazing, given that Ravel IMHO isn't even one of the characters that stands out most in the game. (Important, but not central.)
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Re: General Writing FAQs and Resources

#9 Post by Auro-Cyanide » Fri Jun 22, 2012 10:14 pm

Maybe this will help some people since I have seen a couple topics on villains: http://www.deviantart.com/#/d52pexu

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Re: General Writing FAQs and Resources

#10 Post by Sapphi » Sun Aug 26, 2012 2:48 am

Recently, I discovered Project Gutenberg, which is a movement whose mission it is to make old books with expired copyrights freely accessible for everyone to read. Even if you don't have an E-Reader, you can download HTML or plain-text forms of the books. There is a wealth of reference information here for various topics that could potentially be of use for writers. It's useful for finding outdated medical texts, for instance, or studying old rules of etiquette.
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Re: General Writing FAQs and Resources

#11 Post by dramspringfeald » Wed Nov 07, 2012 1:25 pm

As a Developer and Writer of your project you have to always ask yourself the "Why's" of everything you do. You don't need to know the answers right off the bat but you will need them at the end.

Always ask yourself these questions when writing your project, they help flesh out everything and help frame your project in the process.

~Each Level of the scene in the project
"Why are your characters there?"
"Why are WE there?"
"How does this enhance the Project?" ~ "Why?"
"What does this scene say about my characters?" ~ "Why?"
"Dose my character even need to be here?" ~ "Why?"
"Dose this advance the plot?" ~ "Why?"

~Each chapter
"How does this enhance my life?" ~ "Why?"
"Does this teach me something?" ~ "Why?"
"How does this enhance the lives of my players?" ~ "Why?"

~The Whole project
"Why am I making this?"
"What do I want to learn while making this project?" ~ "Why?"
"What do I want them to experience?" ~ "Why?" ~Goes well in Each level too
"How does this enhance my life?" ~ "Why?"

Sounds really deep but asking these questions also helps you keep on track and helps you keep everything in check. They also tend to balloon into even more questions. which in turn adds even more structure to the project. I've read over many titles on here that didn't even come close to answering these question and burned to the ground before they ever got started. What's interesting, these same questions can be used on all media from books to movies and web comics.

Hope this helps get those juices flowing. :3
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Re: General Writing FAQs and Resources

#12 Post by destiny_921 » Wed Dec 12, 2012 6:25 pm

If you asked me this before, I would have just answered, "I just want to write." But then, I realized after some time that, "No. It's not only because of that. I want to do something different. I want to do something big. I want others to know."

The question?

What message do you want to bring with the story?

Is it to increase awareness about the negative issues around us, or because you were inspired? To encourage people to take action? To let people know that, "Hey, it's okay to believe."? What? What is your purpose of writing the story? What do you want to show with the story?

Words, as I see them - as well as each and every letter is an art. Letters make words, words make sentences and phrases - creating imagery based on various settings. Steam-punk, underworld, fantasy, reality - you name it, and there's it. All you have to do is sit down on your chair as your ideas dance about in your head, and bring them to life.

Thus the words in my signature:

Like how a picture can paint a thousand words, a thousand words can also paint pictures.
“Think left and think right and think low and think high. Oh, the thinks you can think up if only you try”
– Dr. Seuss

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Re: General Writing FAQs and Resources

#13 Post by dramspringfeald » Wed Feb 27, 2013 10:45 am

Don't be a Poser! Learn to Draw
Learn to Draw with Stan Lee
Learn to Draw with Mark Crilley
If you want you can brows my art. My art can be found at...FA // IB // DA Neglected for a few years so I'm just now updating it

Learn to break a bone to break a bone,
Learn to build a house to build a house,
Learn to make a Game to make a Game.

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Re: General Writing FAQs and Resources

#14 Post by Obscura » Wed Apr 17, 2013 4:36 pm

Most of you have probably already seen this, but here are some helpful writing tips from Trey Parker and Matt Stone.

http://www.getstoried.com/storytelling- ... outh-park/

The "but" and "therefore" rule is an excellent piece of storytelling advice.
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Re: General Writing FAQs and Resources

#15 Post by Obscura » Fri Apr 26, 2013 11:55 pm

Legend Elmore Leonard with some of best writing advice I've ever heard. Apologies for the choppy quality of the video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PeZQl2nvnfM
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